Tag Archives: garlic

Perfectly Simple Sauteed Mushrooms (5 ingredients)

12 May

The warmer weather calls for simpler fare, meals that are tasty and uncomplicated and straightforward.

I sizzle the roast garlic in the oil

I sizzle the roast garlic in the oil

These mushrooms are just that – similar to the classic Spanish tapa champiñones al ajillo, but quicker and easier.

Into the skillet. They suck up the oil at first, but do not be alarmed. They get a bit of char and then you add the wine and they release their juices.

Into the skillet. They suck up the oil at first, but do not be alarmed. They get a bit of char and then you add the wine and they release their juices.

Thanks to Valerie from the Farmingdale Music Center, I had a container of delicious home-roasted garlic to lend a bit more complexity, but regular raw garlic will work just fine.

Yum

Yum

We had these on the side for Mother’s Day…they were a great accompaniment to grilled sirloin steak

Salt and pepper crusted sirloin

Salt and pepper crusted sirloin

and our first local asparagus of the season from Sang Lee on the North Fork of Long Island.

The kid's contribution to the menu

The kid’s contribution to the menu

 

Simple and delicious

Simple and delicious

Basic sauteed mushrooms

1 lb mushrooms, wiped and woody stems removed

1-2 Tbs extra virgin olive oil

1 Tbs roasted garlic or minced raw garlic

A glug or two of red wine

Pinch of salt

Sprinkle of parsley (optional)

Make sure mushrooms are clean (wiping them takes longer than rinsing, but helps them look nicer)

Heat olive oil and garlic together to medium high. Add mushrooms and cook, stirring to coat. When the mushrooms begin to get tender, add red wine and allow to bubble until mushrooms begin to release their own juices (a minute or two). Season with salt and parsley and you’re set!

Advertisements

At Least We’ve Got Some Beautiful Garlic….

31 Jul

Our vegetable garden has been fairly catastrophic this year. Aside from a decent harvest of peas and some nice lettuces, much of what we have planted has been eaten by critters, rotted by excessive rain, wilted by excessive heat, or inexplicably stunted. The radishes never took off, the broccoli hasn’t produced a single floret, the eggplant looks like an bad bonsai experiment — utterly lacking in buds to boot — even the basil has been chewed to a lace and ribs, and do you know ANYONE who can plant zucchini two years in a row and only have ONE, that’s right, ONE SINGLE SOLITARY, zucchini to show for it? That’s just pitiful.

Helping out with garlic harvest at Restoration Farm (in 100 degree heat!?!)

Helping out with garlic harvest at Restoration Farm (in 100 degree heat!?!)

Well, I could go on, but that might jinx the tomatoes, which actually look quite good, except I think my watering has not been consistent and there could be some blossom end rot in my future.

So, I will look on the bright side and say that not only did our garlic produce lovely scapes earlier in the season, but we are also drying a healthy bunch of our own garlic bulbs, planted last October in our raised beds from a head that I reserved from Restoration Farm last season.

Accentuate the positive...our homegrown organic garlic is beautiful and heady with fragrance. My friend Vic Munoz calls this stage: terrestrial jellyfish

Accentuate the positive…our homegrown organic garlic is beautiful and heady with fragrance. My friend Vic Muñoz calls them terrestrial jellyfish for their look!

So, no recipe today. Just a deep breath, thanking goodness that I am not depending on my crop to feed my family. A celebration of what has gone right. And a resolution to keep trying. Because knowing how to grow your own food is important and because perseverance is important and because everything takes time to master.

Wish me luck with the fall vegetables, some of which are already planted….

 

 

Grilled Lemon Chicken – Bring on the Barbecue Season!

25 May

Bored with boring, boring chicken? So was I, until I remembered this quick marinade with the fresh flavors that Spring demands: lemon, basil and garlic. You basically toss it all together in a sealable plastic bag or tub in the morning, and by the time you get home from work it is ready for the grill. Add some grilled veggies, a salad, or some couscous and you could be eating really delicious food about 15 minutes after walking in the door.

Try it out this Memorial Day Weekend and you’ll be going back to it all summer long. Leftovers are great for next-day sandwiches or salad toppers. Thanks to Food To Live By by Myra Goodman (of Earthbound Farms) for the inspiration for this adaptation.

Grilled Lemon Basil Chicken

4 chicken breast halves (6-8 oz each), pounded thin

¼ fresh lemon juice

½ Cup extra virgin olive oil (if you have a seasoned oil, like basil oil or garlic oil, you can substitute up to half the plain olive oil with it)

1 heaping Tbs garlic, minced

2 heaping Tbs minced fresh basil (1 Tbs dried)

½ tsp salt

Several generous gratings fresh ground pepper

Place pounded chicken breasts in a quart-size resealable plastic bag

In a separate bowl, whisk lemon juice, olive oil(s), garlic, basil, salt, and pepper. Add to bag, seal and refrigerate for a minimum of 3 hours.

Preheat barbecue grill to medium-high or heat up your grill pan and spray a bit of cooking oil (only if your pan tends to stick).

Remove chicken from bag and discard remaining marinade. Grill, turning twice, about 4- 6 minutes on each side, depending on thickness, until fully-cooked (there should be no pinkness in the center). Serve with a salad or couscous or pasta with pesto!

%d bloggers like this: