Coquito: Puerto Rican Egg Nog (this one without eggs!)

22 Dec

2015-12-26 17.16.25In Puerto Rico, as soon as the Thanksgiving turkey is scraped off the plates, our collective thoughts turn to what we are going to eat for Christmas. But we are not just talking about Christmas Eve or Christmas day, oh no.We’re talking about every day for the next two months.

Recipes written by by late, great-aunt Titi Amida for my mother.

Recipes written by by late, great-aunt Titi Amida for my mother.

Christmas lasts from the day after Thanksgiving well into January, with the Feast of the Epiphany or Three Kings Day on January 6th, followed by octavas (the eight days after Three Kings Day) which are then followed by octavitas, which last for another eight days. And since we’re practically into February by then, you might as well keep celebrating until Valentine’s Day on the 14th….We have to do it this way, to give everyone who wants to have a Christmas party the opportunity. Twelve days of Christmas are just not enough to give everyone a turn at hosting.

Tasting in progress

Tasting in progress

That’s a lot of menu planning. We are helped by our Christmas songs, which are sometimes paeans to the birth of Jesus, but more often they are odes to the pig…that is.. lechón or spit-roasted suckling pig.

In small servings this homey cocktail can look quite elegant

In small servings this homey cocktail can look quite elegant

Some folks serve it on the rocks. I do like it a bit diluted. You could also top off with a bit more rum.

Some folks serve it on the rocks. I do like it a bit diluted. You could also top off with a bit more rum.

When it comes to beverages, the Queen of Christmas Toddies is coquito, a sweet and sometimes lethal combination of rum, cream of coconut, and condensed and evaporated milk in its more basic form, but which can also include egg yolks, different types of alcohol, more or less cinnamon, vanilla, and much more.

These bottles from IKEA look great for hostess gifts

These bottles from IKEA look great for hostess gifts

Today’s recipe (thank you to my former San Juan Star colleague Todd Michael Jamison for sending me the original that this is based on several years ago) is quite basic and contains no egg (in the recipes from my great-aunt Titi Amida in the images, she used loads of egg yolks, but she used to get farm-fresh eggs. Now most of us don’t have that kind of access). I like to make a big batch and portion out some into decorative bottles for gifts. When I actually serve, I add a bit more cinnamon and froth individual servings up with some ice in a cocktail shaker – coquito should be served really cold and the ice thins it a bit too, which I like.

In small servings this homey cocktail can look quite elegant

In small servings this homey cocktail can look quite elegant

Coquito (no egg)

30 oz. cream of coconut

14 oz. sweetened condensed milk

12 oz. evaporated milk

½ tsp vanilla extract

8-16 oz of white rum

½ tsp powdered cinnamon (plus extra for garnish)

Pinch nutmeg

Cinnamon sticks for garnish (optional)

Place all ingredients except the optional cinnamon sticks in a blender and blend until smooth and frothy. Serve over ice with a dash of cinnamon, or chill in an cocktail shaker and pour off into a glass (martini glasses look great as do long vodka shot glasses for aperitifs). Top with cinnamon and garnish with a cinnamon stick.

Titi Amida, an accomplished pastry maker, had pages of coquito recipes.

Titi Amida, an accomplished pastry maker, had pages of coquito recipes.

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18 Responses to “Coquito: Puerto Rican Egg Nog (this one without eggs!)”

  1. Therese October 23, 2016 at 9:58 am #

    This looks amazingly yummy! How long can this be kept for?

    • Natalia at Hot, Cheap & Easy October 30, 2016 at 7:47 pm #

      Hi Therese! I have kept it for a couple of weeks. Any longer and it starts to separate. It is best within a few days. ¡Salud!

  2. Bryant Peat December 6, 2015 at 1:18 pm #

    Just made a batch of this , an it is delicious, creamy with a rum kick, luv it.

  3. Adam J. Holland December 13, 2014 at 6:25 am #

    Looks like I caught this the second time around. (Glad I did!) I’m not much of a mixologist, but this looks like something I can do. Thanks, Natalia!

    • Natalia at Hot, Cheap & Easy December 13, 2014 at 12:18 pm #

      A little bit goes a long way! It’s very rich…and depending on how heavy handed you are with the rum….

  4. kathryningrid December 30, 2013 at 1:55 am #

    Fabiana brought a jug of coquito to our little house party just before Christmas and I, having lusted after the stuff in your posts, got to taste it as made by a good Puerto Rican girl at last, and yes, it was ridiculously delicious. I felt it incumbent upon me to taste more than a *little* of it, if you take my meaning. 😀 I’ll try out your recipes (which are very close to hers) now, too! Happy, happy New Year to you and your loved ones, and many happy returns of the coquito!!
    xo

  5. Ashley December 23, 2013 at 5:49 pm #

    This looks delicious and I’ve wanted to try making coquito for a long time. This might be the holiday to do so!

    • Natalia at Hot, Cheap & Easy December 23, 2013 at 10:18 pm #

      It is super-yummy…also super-rich…for those with a sweet tooth it is heavenly!! For the rest of us…add more rum!

  6. Mad Dog December 23, 2013 at 1:51 pm #

    Yum! Egg nog isn’t made very much here, although I believe it was popular in the Middle Ages 🙂

    • Natalia at Hot, Cheap & Easy December 23, 2013 at 2:29 pm #

      Are you suggesting my attitude towards beverages is medieval? Or just that mead would be an excellent alternative?

      • Mad Dog December 23, 2013 at 3:37 pm #

        Ha ha, no I’m suggesting that the English have forgotten something very good 🙂

  7. The Belmont Rooster December 22, 2013 at 11:09 am #

    Looks delicious!

  8. Karen December 22, 2013 at 8:25 am #

    I would extend the holidays too to be able to enjoy a coquito. 🙂 Have a wonderful Christmas and beyond.

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